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TOPIC: Four important keys to tight line turns.

Four important keys to tight line turns. 4 years, 12 months ago #5488

  • BudDavis
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  • Today is a gift, so ski. No promise of more.
Does anyone know who wrote this? I would like to attach a link back to where it came with the author name.

Thank you Jim for: Todd Ristorcelli www.waterskimag.com/how-to/2007/05/17/stop-slackin-2/

Get off the slalom couch and learn four important keys to tight line turns.

For a slalom skier there is no greater source of frustration than a slack-line turn. Whether you are banging buoys in the course or linking turns in the open water, slack rope will interrupt your flow, disrupt your timing and bring an otherwise seamless pass to an overtly abrupt halt. Eliminating slack line is a relatively easy fix. The first step in addressing the problem is recognizing the true cause of “losing the line.” It is important to understand what does and what does not cause slack in the rope.

Speed Check
You know the feeling: You come flying into the turn, the line goes loose and your entire pass becomes disjointed. “I had way too much speed on that one,” you say to yourself. This is the most commonly held misconception regarding the cause of slack rope. You must first understand that you cannot generate too much speed in slalom. Your goal is to create as much speed as possible, so to simply target excessive speed as the source of your undoing is inaccurate. Raw speed alone will never cause your line to go loose in the turn. It is the direction in which you carry that speed that can be the source of your troubles.

Where You Headed?
When you lose direction during the release off the wakes, you are essentially taking a path that will result in a looser line. When you are at your widest point in the turn, you will be closer to the boat than the full length of the line will allow; thus the line will be loose. If you carry your speed out to the widest point possible, your rope will have to be tight. A loss of direction is the only factor that can cause slack rope in the turn. Now that the source of the problem is correctly identified, we can get to work on a solution.

Evaluate Your Intensity
Over-leaning is the second cause of slack line. Too often we get stuck in the mind-set that increasing our lean will result in an increase in speed. However, an increase in lean will only result in added line tension, and as we learned above, this will make it more difficult to keep your direction off the wakes. Once your path has been set out of the turn, concentrate on keeping the tension on the line consistent as you move closer into the wakes. By staying open to the boat with equal pressure on both arms, you can allow your ski to truly accelerate and avoid simply “burying” your shoulder into the wakes. This will ensure you do not overlean and create more tension on the line than can be effectively handled. Now with controlled intensity you will release efficiently through the wakes and continue on your path to the widest point a tight line will allow.

Adjust Your Timing
The most common cause of a loss of direction and the subsequent slack line is simply pulling too long. The further past the second wake you stay on your outside (cutting) edge, the more your back arm pressure will increase. As this back arm pressure increases, it becomes more difficult to maintain your position. As a result, you are likely to get pulled back in toward the boat, causing your center of mass (or your hips) to move away from the handle and your tip to point down the lake before you want it to. You are now set on a path destined to be narrower than the full length of the rope will allow. You will not reach your widest possible point, and the rope will go loose. To combat this problem, start your edge change earlier. If you have good acceleration into the wakes, you can start your release as soon as you come through the second wake. This will allow you to control your line tension and continue on the cross-course path you set out of the previous turn.

Re: Four important keys to tight line turns. 4 years, 12 months ago #5491

  • LEE
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Excellent Article! (sounds like Wade Cox or Marcus...)

Question: " As this back arm pressure increases, it becomes more difficult to maintain your position..."

Are we talking about "Trailing Arm" pressure?

Re: Four important keys to tight line turns. 4 years, 12 months ago #5492

Lee, great question and perfectly illustrates why it should be referred to as leading and trailing, not back and front... I believe in the setting this author is talking about he is actually referring to the "leading" arm.
The following user(s) said Thank You: LEE

Re: Four important keys to tight line turns. 4 years, 12 months ago #5493

  • BudDavis
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  • Today is a gift, so ski. No promise of more.
My impression was that after you went through the gate and started getting away from the center line, the pressure would increase on your right arm (He said back arm.) (A lot of people now would probably call that the leading arm I think.) as you approached #1 turn buoy causing you to lose your out bound direction as the tip of the ski started pointing more down course.



_________________________________________________

Edit:

Dave,
I saw your post after I posted. I agree with you.
The following user(s) said Thank You: LEE

Re: Four important keys to tight line turns. 4 years, 12 months ago #5494

Re: Four important keys to tight line turns. 4 years, 12 months ago #5495

Under "Where you are headed": Is the author saying that you should be carrying speed to the widest point possible prior to turning or is the former the correct thing to do?

Re: Four important keys to tight line turns. 4 years, 12 months ago #5496

I think in theory you should "start" your turn immediately off the second wake by changing edges...but then yes I think he is saying that you should carry speed and ski to the widest point possible in order to keep a tight line and no slack.

Re: Four important keys to tight line turns. 4 years, 12 months ago #5497

  • LEE
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david38off wrote:
I think in theory you should "start" your turn immediately off the second wake by changing edges...but then yes I think he is saying that you should carry speed and ski to the widest point possible in order to keep a tight line and no slack.


I agree.

Re: Four important keys to tight line turns. 4 years, 12 months ago #5498

Thank you for clarifying

Re: Four important keys to tight line turns. 4 years, 12 months ago #5499

  • BudDavis
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  • Today is a gift, so ski. No promise of more.
Myles,
I do not think the words he chose in his second sentence did justice to the point he was making.

Where You Headed?
"When you lose direction during the release off the wakes, you are essentially taking a path that will result in a looser line. When you are at your widest point in the turn, you will be closer to the boat than the full length of the line will allow; thus the line will be loose. If you carry your speed out to the widest point possible, your rope will have to be tight. A loss of direction is the only factor that can cause slack rope in the turn. Now that the source of the problem is correctly identified, we can get to work on a solution."



This is what I picture: Imagine a parked boat in a parking lot with a 40 foot rope on the pylon and there is a cone 40 feet behind the boat and 90° off to the right of the boat there is a cone 35 feet away.

If I am on a bicycle with the other end of the rope tied to the frame, and I ride in a straight line from the cone behind the boat to the cone to the right of the boat; the rope would be very slack. If I tried to turn right the whole time I peddled, the rope would stay tight and I would arrive at the cone two feet wider. We would have also ridden in a perfect arc.

Now, if a truck was pulling the boat through the parking lot and we still turned the bike wheel to the right while we were being pulled, we would still get about 40 wide of the boat, but we would not have ridden in an arc.

Even though we do not ski in an arc path through the course; picturing the swing of a pendulum can often be a useful aide to helping with the mental image to stay the rope distance from the boat as we catch up out to the side of the boat.

The actual path of the skier from overhead looks more like a 43° straight line behind the boat and then a long curved turn from the edge change to connecting back with the handle out of the turn buoy.


Overheadskiing.PNG


Re: Four important keys to tight line turns. 4 years, 12 months ago #5500

  • LEE
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I really like his choice of words, while expressing this common problem and a very common misconception...

Quote: "You must first understand that you cannot generate too much speed in slalom."

(That is an awesome statement!)

"Your goal is to create as much speed as possible, so to simply target excessive speed as the source of your undoing is inaccurate. Raw speed alone will never cause your line to go loose in the turn. It is the direction in which you carry that speed that can be the source of your troubles." End Quote


I was unable to make the strides that I was shooting for this past Summer. But, what I believe Todd is saying, is the key to utilizing the Early Speed & angle that I was trying to get the hang of. Heck, I guess if I could learn to adapt some better counter-intuitive skills, I could probably utilize my infamous late Speed better too!

Note to self: You cannot generate too much speed! -only Bad direction!!!

Re: Four important keys to tight line turns. 4 years, 12 months ago #5506

Thx for clarifying bud, good example.

Re: Four important keys to tight line turns. 4 years, 12 months ago #5507

  • AB
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What is the downside if you accelerate too fast after a turn? Assume you get under control by the middle of the wake.

Re: Four important keys to tight line turns. 4 years, 12 months ago #5508

  • LEE
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  • So, your sayin' there's a chance!
AB wrote:
What is the downside if you accelerate too fast after a turn? Assume you get under control by the middle of the wake.


AB, can you clarify in context to the Article? -I only see the point that you can never generate too much speed...

Of course, for me not enough Early Speed and too much "Late Speed" is usually coupled with a Generally "Late and Narrow" pass anyway.

I'd think the more speed thru the Turns and all the way to the 1st wake would always be the best scenario. The trick then is in maintaining the optimum "Outbound" direction. -many times when I am way early and in great shape, I am likely tempted to relax and coast a bit. Only to get sucked back in narrow with the need for an extra Hard Turn to avoid the slack...

Re: Four important keys to tight line turns. 6 months, 3 weeks ago #9567

  • BudDavis
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  • Today is a gift, so ski. No promise of more.
I am starting to get on the water a little bit, and want to get rid of some old habits. One of my worst is slack line. I searched the site and found this thread to re-read in hopes to do better this year.
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